Andrew N. Meltzoff, Ph.D.

Professor and Co-Director

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Bio

Professor, Department of Psychology
Co-Director, UW Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences
Job and Gertrud Tamaki Endowed Chair

Dr. Andrew N. Meltzoff holds the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Endowed Chair in Psychology and is the Co-Director of the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences. A graduate of Harvard, with a PhD from Oxford, he is an internationally renowned expert on infant and child development. His discoveries about infant imitation helped transform our understanding of early cognition and social learning and sparked experiments on infant neural body maps in developmental cognitive neuroscience. His research on preschoolers' social biases and children's STEM-gender stereotypes has helped build bridges between developmental and social psychology. His recent work on infant altruism continues to expand these interdisciplinary connections.

Meltzoff's research on young children has had implications for cognitive psychology, especially concerning memory and intentionality; for brain science, especially for multimodal coding and shared neural circuits for perception and action; and for educational science, concerning the impact of role models and cultural stereotypes on child development. Meltzoff's 'Like-Me' framework for social development, which holds that young children seek out and register other social beings as 'like me,' has engendered empirical and theoretical work in autism spectrum disorder, social robotics, developmental cognitive neuroscience, and philosophy of mind.

Dr. Meltzoff received the 2020 William James Fellow Award from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) for a lifetime of significant intellectual contributions to the basic science of psychology. In 2020, he also received the G. Stanley Hall Award from the American Psychological Association for distinguished contributions to developmental psychology. Dr. Meltzoff was awarded the Kurt Koffka Medal (Germany) in 2016. He also received the Kenneth Craik Award in Psychology, Cambridge University (2005), was recognized for outstanding research by the Society for Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics (2005), and was a recipient of the MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Meltzoff is a fellow/elected member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Cognitive Science Society, APA, and APS, and is a foreign member into the Norwegian Academy of Science & Letters. In 2019 he was named one of the 50 Most Influential Living Psychologists.

Dr. Meltzoff has published more than 280 papers/chapters, and has a Google Scholar h-index of 110. Meltzoff is the co-author of two books about early learning and the brain: The Scientist in the Crib (Morrow Press, 2000) and Words, Thoughts, and Theories (MIT Press, 1997). He is also co-editor of The Imitative Mind: Development, Evolution and Brain Bases (Cambridge University Press, 2002), a multidisciplinary volume combining neuroscience, evolutionary theory, and developmental psychology.

Dr. Meltzoff serves on the scientific advisory board of the Bezos Family Foundation, the board of directors of the national Zero to Three organization (WA, DC), and the board of advisors for the Bay Area Discovery Museum. He has also served on the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine National Research Council Board on Children, Youth, and Families, the board of directors of the Foundation for Early Learning (founded by Melinda Gates and Mona Locke), the board of directors of the University Child Development School, and the national advisory committee for grants of the March of Dimes Foundation. Dr. Meltzoff has appeared on PBS' Scientific American Frontiers, ABC's World News Now, NBC's Today Show, and the CBC's Discovery series. He has co-authored prominent op-ed pieces on how children's STEM stereotypes influence identity development and schooling (Washington Post, 2017; Los Angeles Times, 2017). Meltzoff is married to Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl, and they have one daughter.

CV

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Educational Background

Oxford University, Ph.D., 1976
Harvard University, B.A., 1972

 

Academic Positions Held

University of Washington
Professor, Psychology, 1988-present
Adjunct Professor, College of Education, 2004-present
Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,
   School of Medicine, 1989-present
Adjunct Professor, Speech & Hearing Sciences, 1997-present
Associate Professor, Psychology, 1984-1988
Research Instructor/Assistant Professor, 1977-1984

 

Awards and Professional Offices

Awards
APS William James Fellow Award (2020)
G. Stanley Hall Award (American Psychological Association 2020)
50 Most Influential Living Psychologists (2019)
Simms/Mann Foundation Award (2018)
Kurt Koffka Medal (Germany, 2016)
Super-Hero for Washington State Families. ParentMap Magazine (2014)
Kenneth Craig Research Award, Cambridge University, England (2005)
Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, Outstanding Research Award (2005)
National Institutes of Health MERIT Award (1998-2008)
APS James McKeen Cattell Sabbatical Award (1990-1991)
Elected Member
American Academy of Arts & Sciences (elected 2009)
Washington State Academy of Sciences (elected 2010)
Norwegian Academy of Science & Letters, Inducted as foreign member (elected 1996)
Fellow
Society of Experimental Psychologists (elected 2016)
Cognitive Science Society (elected 2014)
Association for Psychological Science (elected 1989)
American Psychological Association (elected 1988)
American Association for the Advancement of Science (elected 1986)
Editorial Boards
Associate Editor, Developmental Science (2000-2010)
Associate Editor, British Journal of Developmental Psychology (1988-1998)
Editorial Board, Infancy (1999-2004)
Editorial Board, Developmental Psychobiology (1999-2002)
Editorial Board, Journal of Cognition and Development (1999-2002)
Editorial Board, Infant Behavior and Development (1983-1999)
Editorial Board, Cognitive Development (1995-1999)
Editorial Board, Child Development (1984-1988)
Professional Offices
Scientific Advisory Board, Bezos Family Foundation (2015-present)
Board of Advisors, Bay Area Discovery Museum, Center for Childhood Creativity (2013-present)
Board, National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine, National Research Council Board on
   Children, Youth, and Families (2010-2013)
Board of Directors, Foundation for Early Learning (2000-2009)
Board of Trustees, University Child Development School (1993-1997)
Current/Recent Research Grants
Meltzoff (co-Principal Investigator).
   ‘Gender stereotypes in STEM: Exploring developmental patterns for prevention.’ U.S. Institute for
   Education Sciences (R305A180167). 2018-2022.
Meltzoff, A.N. (co-Principal Investigator)
   ‘Who likes computer science: How gender stereotypes about interest shape children’s motivation.’
   National Science Foundation (DRL-1849902). 2018-2020.
Meltzoff (Principal Investigator).
   ‘Developmental emergence of math-gender stereotypes and math self-concepts.’ National Science
   Foundation (HRD-1661285). 2017-2020.
Meltzoff (Principal Investigator).
   ‘Development of neural body maps.’ National Science Foundation (SMA-1540619). 2015-2019.

Publications

Books

Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2000). The scientist in the crib: What early learning tells us about the mind. New York: HarperCollins. Read an excerpt | Buy on Amazon.com
 
 
 
Meltzoff, A. N., & Prinz, W. (2002). The imitative mind: Development, evolution, and brain bases. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
 
 
 
Gopnik, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1997). Words, thoughts, and theories. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Click to read | Buy on Amazon.com
 
 
 

Journal Special Issues

Grossberg, S., Meltzoff, A., Movellan, J., & Newcombe, N. (2010). Edited Special Issue of Neural Networks entitled “Social cognition: From babies to robots.”
 
 
 
Meltzoff, A. N. & Lent, R. (2016). Edited special edition of UNESCO Prospects entitled “Brain science, education, and learning: Making connections.
 
 
 

Publications (h-index =110)

 

Most Recent

 

Shen, G., Meltzoff, A. N., Weiss, S. M., & Marshall, P. J. (2020). Body representation in infants: Categorical boundaries of body parts as assessed by somatosensory mismatch negativity. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 44, 100795. Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). The development of negative event-emotion matching in infancy: Implications for theories in affective science. Affective Science, 1, 4-19. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Body maps in the infant brain: Implications for neurodevelopmental disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 778-783. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Cultural stereotypes and sense of belonging contribute to gender gaps in STEM. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 12, 152-198. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Imitation in Chinese preschool children: Influence of prior self-experience and pedagogical cues on the imitation of novel acts in a non-western culture. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, 662. Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). Superordinate categorization of negative facial expressions in infancy: The influence of labels. Developmental Psychology, 56, 671-685. Click here to receive a reprint

Barragan, R. C., Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Altruistic food sharing behavior by human infants after a hunger manipulation. Scientific Reports, 10, 1785. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., Singleton, J. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Enhanced gaze-following behavior in Deaf infants of Deaf parents. Developmental Science, 23, e12900. Click here to receive a reprint

Rosen, M. L., Hagen, M. P., Lurie, L. A., Miles, Z. E., Sheridan, M. A., Meltzoff, A. N., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2019). Cognitive stimulation as a mechanism linking socioeconomic status with executive function: A longitudinal investigation. Child Development. Advance online publication. doi:10.1111/cdev.13315 Click here to receive a reprint

Shen, G., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2019). Body representations as indexed by oscillatory EEG activities in the context of tactile novelty processing. Neuropsychologia, 132, 107144. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.107144 Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., Olson, K. R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2019). Acquiring group bias: Observing other people's nonverbal signals can create social group biases. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1037/pspi0000218 Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. R. (2019). How do you feel? Preverbal infants match negative emotions to events. Developmental Psychology, 55, 1138-1149. doi:10.1037/dev0000711 Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Saby, J. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2019). Neural representations of the body in 60-day-old human infants. Developmental Science, 22, e12698. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L, & Meltzoff, A. N. (2019). Childhood experiences and intergroup biases among children. Social Issues and Policy Review,13, 211240. Click here to receive a reprint

del Río, M. F., Strasser, K., Cvencek, D., Susperreguy, M. I., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2019). Chilean kindergarten children’s beliefs about mathematics: Family matters. Developmental Psychology, 55, 687–702. Click here to receive a reprint

Theory of Developmental Psychology

 

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). The development of negative event-emotion matching in infancy: Implications for theories in affective science. Affective Science, 1, 4-19. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Cultural stereotypes and sense of belonging contribute to gender gaps in STEM. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 12, 152-198. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Imitation in Chinese preschool children: Influence of prior self-experience and pedagogical cues on the imitation of novel acts in a non-western culture. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, 662. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Body maps in the infant brain: Implications for neurodevelopmental disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 778-783 Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). Superordinate categorization of negative facial expressions in infancy: The influence of labels. Developmental Psychology, 56, 671-685. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., Singleton, J. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Enhanced gaze-following behavior in Deaf infants of Deaf parents. Developmental Science, 23, e12900. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Human infant imitation as a social survival circuit. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 24, 130–136. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. Ramírez, R. R., Saby, J. N., Larson, E., & Taulu, S., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Infant brain responses to felt and observed touch of hands and feet: An MEG study. Developmental Science, 21, e12651. Click here to receive a reprint

Loucks, J., Mutschler, C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Children's representation and imitation of events: How goal organization influences 3-year-old children's memory for action sequences. Cognitive Science, 41, 1904–1933. Click here to receive a reprint

Rogers, L. O., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Is gender more important and meaningful than race? An analysis of racial and gender identity among Black, White, and Mixed-race children. Cultural Diverstiy and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 23, 323–334. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2017). Imitation and modeling. In: M. M. Haith & J. B. Benson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of infant and early childhood development: Reference module in neuroscience and biobehavioral psychology (pp. 1–10). London, UK: Elsevier. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Olson, K. R. (2017). "Catching" social bias: Exposure to biased nonverbal signals creates social biases in preschool children. Psychological Science, 28, 216–224. Click here to receive a reprint

Rabinowitch, T., &Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Synchronized movement experience enhances peer cooperation in preschool children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 160, 21–32. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Social group membership increases STEM engagement among preschoolers. Developmental Psychology, 53, 201–206. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2016). Motivation and identity. In K. Wentzel & D. Miele (Eds.), Handbook of motivation at school (2nd edition, pp. 300–319). Taylor & Francis/Routledge, London: England. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Greenwald, A. G., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2016). Implicit measures for preschool children confirm self-esteem's role in maintaining a balanced identity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 62, 50–57. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Body maps in the infant brain. Trends in Cognitive Science, 19, 483–544. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Origins of social cognition: Bidirectional self-other mapping and the “Like-Me” hypothesis. In M. Banaji & S. Gelman (Eds.), Navigating the social world: What infants, children, and other species can teach us (pp. 139–144). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2013). Imitation: Social, cognitive, and theoretical perspectives. In P. R. Zelazo (Ed.). Oxford handbook of developmental psychology (pp. 651–682). NY: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Moll, H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Perspective-taking and its foundation in joint attention. In N. Eilan, H. Lerman, & J. Roessler (Eds.), Perception, causation, and objectivity. Issues in philosophy and psychology (pp. 286–304). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Social cognition and the origins of imitation, empathy, and theory of mind. In U. Goswami (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of childhood cognitive development 2nd Edition (pp. 49–75). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Kuhl, P. K., Movellan, J., & Sejnowski, T. J. (2009). Foundations for a new science of learning. Science, 325, 284–288. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Numerical identity and the development of object permanence. In S. P. Johnson (Ed.), Neoconstructivism: The new science of cognitive development (pp. 61–83). New York: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). ‘Like me’: a foundation for social cognition. Developmental Science, 10, 126–134. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). The ‘like me’ framework for recognizing and becoming an intentional agent. Acta Psychologica, 124, 26–43. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1998). Object representation, identity, and the paradox of early permanence: Steps toward a new framework. Infant Behavior and Development, 21, 201–235. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1990). Towards a developmental cognitive science: The implications of cross-modal matching and imitation for the development of representation and memory in infancy. In A. Diamond (Ed.), The development and neural bases of higher cognitive functions, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 608 (pp. 1–31). New York: New York Academy of Sciences. Click here to receive a reprint

Infant Imitation and Memory Development

Action Imitation

Wang, Z., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Imitation in Chinese preschool children: Influence of prior self-experience and pedagogical cues on the imitation of novel acts in a non-western culture. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, 662. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Human infant imitation as a social survival circuit. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 24, 130–136. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Murray, L., Simpson, E., Heimann, M., Nagy, E., Nadel, J., Pedersen, E. J., Brooks, R., Messinger, D. S., De Pascalis, L., Subiaul, F., Paukner, A., & Ferrari, P. F. (2018). Re-examination of Oostenbroek et al. (2016): Evidence for neonatal imitation of tongue protrusion. Developmental Science, 21, e12609. Click here to receive a reprint

Loucks, J., Mutschler, C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Children's representation and imitation of events: How goal organization influences 3-year-old children's memory for action sequences. Cognitive Science, 41, 1904–1933. Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B. M., Meltzoff, A. N., Hennings, T. M., & Ruba, A. L. (2016). Transfer of social learning across contexts: Exploring infants’ attribution of trail-like emotions to adults. Infancy, 21, 785–806. Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B. M., Meltzoff, A. N., Toub, T. S., & Ruba, A. L. (2016). Infants’ generalizations about other people’s emotions: Foundations for trait-like attributions. Developmental Psychology, 52, 364–378. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., Williamson, R. A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Imitation as a mechanism in cognitive development: a cross-cultural investigation of 4-year-old children's rule learning. Frontiers in Pyschology, 6, 562. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2015). Social learning promotes understanding of the physical world: Preschool children's imitation of weight sorting. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 136, 82–91. Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B., Meltzoff, A. N., Rowe, H., & Toub, T. S. (2014). Infant, control thyself: Infants' integration of multiple social cues to regulate their imitative behavior. Cognitive Development, 32, 46–57. Click here to receive a reprint

Loucks, J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Goals influence memory and imitation for dynamic human action in 36-month-old children. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 54, 41–50. Click here to receive a reprint

Zack, E., Gerhardstein, P., Meltzoff, A. N., & Barr, R. (2013). 15-month-olds’ transfer of learning between touch screen and real world displays: Language cues and cognitive loads. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 54, 20–25. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Williamson, R. A., & Marshall, P. J. (2013). Developmental perspectives on action science: Lessons from infant imitation and cognitive neuroscience. In W. Prinz, M. Beisert, & A. Herwig (Eds.), Action science: Foundations of an emerging discipline (pp. 281–306). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2013). Imitation: Social, cognitive, and theoretical perspectives. In P. R. Zelazo (Ed.). Oxford handbook of developmental psychology (pp. 651-682). NY: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Waismeyer, A., & Gopnik, A. (2012). Learning about causes from people: Observational causal learning in 24-month-old infants. Developmental Psychology, 48, 1215–1228. Click here to receive a reprint

Saby, J. N., Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2012). Neural correlates of being imitated: An EEG study in preverbal infants. Social Neuroscience, 7, 650–661. Click here to receive a reprint

Williamson, R. A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Own and others’ prior experiences influence children’s imitation of causal acts. Cognitive Development, 26, 260–268. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2010). The importance of imitation for theories of social-cognitive development. In G. Bremner & T. Wachs (Eds.), Handbook of infant development 2nd Edition (pp. 345–364). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Click here to receive a reprint

Williamson, R. A., Jaswal, V. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2010). Learning the rules: Observation and imitation of a sorting strategy by 36-month-old children. Developmental Psychology, 46, 57–65. Click here to receive a reprint

Zack, E., Barr, R., Gerhardstein, P., Dickerson, K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Infant imitation from television using novel touch screen technology. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 13–26. Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B. M., Meltzoff, A. N., & Olsen, B. (2008). Infants' understanding of the link between visual perception and emotion: "If she can't see me doing it, she won't get angry". Developmental Psychology, 44, 561–574. Click here to receive a reprint

Williamson, R. A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Markman, E. M. (2008). Prior experiences and perceived efficacy influence 3-year-olds' imitation. Developmental Psychology, 44, 275–285. Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). Emotional eavesdropping: Infants selectively respond to indirect emotional signals. Child Development, 78, 503–521. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2002). Elements of a developmental theory of imitation. In A. N. Meltzoff, & W. Prinz (Eds.), The imitative mind: Development, evolution, and brain bases (pp. 19–41). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Gleissner, B., Meltzoff, A. N., & Bekkering H. (2000). Children's coding of human action: Cognitive factors influencing imitation in 3-year-olds. Developmental Science, 3, 405–414. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1999). Resolving the debate about early imitation. In A. Slater & D. Muir (Eds.), The Blackwell reader in developmental psychology (pp. 151–155). Oxford, England: Blackwell. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1997). Explaining facial imitation: A theoretical model. Early Development and Parenting, 6, 79–192. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1994). Imitation, memory, and the representation of persons. Infant Behavior and Development, 17, 83–99. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1992). Early imitation within a functional framework: The importance of person identity, movement, and development. Infant Behavior and Development, 15, 479–505. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1989). Imitation in newborn infants: Exploring the range of gestures imitated and the underlying mechanisms. Developmental Psychology, 25, 954–962. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1985). Immediate and deferred imitation in fourteen- and twenty-four-month-old infants. Child Development, 56, 62–72. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1983). Newborn infants imitate adult facial gestures. Child Development, 54, 702–709. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1977). Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates. Science, 198, 75–78. Click here to receive a reprint

Imitation and Memory

Loucks, J., Mutschler, C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Children's representation and imitation of events: How goal organization influences 3-year-old children's memory for action sequences. Cognitive Science, 41, 1904–1933. Click here to receive a reprint

Loucks, J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Goals influence memory and imitation for dynamic human action in 36-month-old children. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 54, 41–50. Click here to receive a reprint

Heimann, M., Strid, K., Smith, L., Tjus, T., Ulvund, S. E., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2006). Exploring the relation between memory, gestural communication, and the emergence of language in infancy: A longitudinal study. Infant and Child Development, 15, 233–249. Click here to receive a reprint

Klein, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1999). Long-term memory, forgetting, and deferred imitation in 12-month-old infants. Developmental Science, 2, 102–113. Click here to receive a reprint

Barnat, S. B., Klein, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1996). Deferred imitation across changes in context and object: Memory and generalization in 14-month-old infants. Infant Behavior and Development, 19, 241–251. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1995). What infant memory tells us about infantile amnesia: Long-term recall and deferred imitation. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 59, 497–515. Click here to receive a reprint

Hanna, E., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1993). Peer imitation by toddlers in laboratory, home, and day-care contexts: Implications for social learning and memory. Developmental Psychology, 29, 701–710. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1988). Infant imitation and memory: Nine-month-olds in immediate and deferred tests. Child Development, 59, 217–225. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1988). Imitation of televised models by infants. Child Development, 59, 1221–1229. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1988). Infant imitation after a 1-week delay: Long-term memory for novel acts and multiple stimuli. Developmental Psychology, 24, 470–476. Click here to receive a reprint

Vocal Imitation

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1996). Infant vocalizations in response to speech: Vocal imitation and developmental change. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 100, 2425–2438. Click here to receive a reprint

Theory of Mind

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). The development of negative event-emotion matching in infancy: Implications for theories in affective science. Affective Science, 1, 4-19. Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Repacholi, B. M. (2020). Superordinate categorization of negative facial expressions in infancy: The influence of labels. Developmental Psychology, 56, 671-685. Click here to receive a reprint

Ruba, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., Repacholi, B. R. (2019). How do you feel? Preverbal infants match negative emotions to events. Developmental Psychology. 55, 1138-1149 doi:10.1037/dev0000711 Click here to receive a reprint

Repacholi, B. M., Meltzoff, A. N., Toub, T. S., & Ruba, A. L. (2016). Infants’ generalizations about other people’s emotions: Foundations for trait-like attributions. Developmental Psychology, 52, 364–378. Click here to receive a reprint

Williamson, R. A., Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). The sound of social cognition: Toddlers' Understanding of how sound influences others. Journal of Cognition and Development, 6, 252–260. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Connecting the dots from infancy to childhood: A longitudinal study connecting gaze following, language, and explicit theory of mind. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 130, 67–78. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Gopnik, A. (2013). Learning about the mind from evidence: Children's development ofintuitive theories ofperception and personality. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flausber, & M. Lombardo (Eds.), Understanding other minds 3rd Edition (pp. 19–34). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Sommerville, J. A., Bernstein, D. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2013).  Measuring beliefs in centimeters: Private knowlege biases preschoolers' and adults' representation of others' beliefs. Child Development, 84, 1846–1854. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Social cognition and the origins of imitation, empathy, and theory of mind. In U. Goswami (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of childhood cognitive development 2nd Edition (pp. 49–75). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Click here to receive a reprint

Russell, J., Cheke, L. G., Clayton, N. S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). What can What-When-Where (WWW) binding tasks tell us about young children’s episodic foresight? Theory and two experiments. Cognitive Development, 26, 356–370. Click here to receive a reprint

Moll, H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). How does it look? Level 2 perspective-taking at 36 months of age. Child Development, 82, 661–673. Click here to receive a reprint

Atance, C. M, Bélanger, M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2010). Preschoolers' understanding of others' desires: Fulfilling mine enhances my understanding of yours. Developmental Psychology, 46, 1505–1513. Click here to receive a reprint

Atance, C. M., Bernstein, D. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2010). Thinking about false belief: It's not just what children say, but how long it takes them to say it. Cognition, 116, 297–301. Click here to receive a reprint

Amsterlaw, J., Lagattuta, K. H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Young children’s reasoning about the effects of emotional and physiological states on academic performance. Child Development, 80, 115–133. Click here to receive a reprint

Liu, D., Meltzoff, A. N., & Wellman, H. M. (2009). Neural correlates of belief– and desire–reasoning. Child Development, 80, 1163–1171. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Brooks, R. (2008). Self-experience as a mechanism for learning about others: A training study in social cognition. Developmental Psychology, 44, 1257–1265. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). ‘Like me’: a foundation for social cognition. Developmental Science, 10, 126–134. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). The ‘like me’ framework for recognizing and becoming an intentional agent. Acta Psychologica, 124, 26–43. Click here to receive a reprint

Atance, C. M., Bernstein, D. M., Meltzoff, A. N., & Loftus, G. R. (2007). Hindsight bias and developing theories of mind. Child Development, 78, 1374–1394. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Brooks, R. (2007). Eyes wide shut: The importance of eyes in infant gaze following and understanding of other minds. In R. Flom, K. Lee & D. Muir (Eds.), Gaze following: Its development and significance (pp. 217–241). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Atance, C. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2006). Preschoolers’ Current Desires Warp Their Choices for the Future. Psychological Science, 17, 583–587. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). The development of gaze following and its relation to language. Developmental Science, 8, 535–543. Click here to receive a reprint

Atance, C. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). My future self: Young children's ability to anticipate and explain future states. Cognitive Development, 20, 341–361. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2002). The importance of eyes: How infants interpret adult looking behavior. Developmental Psychology, 38, 958–966. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Brooks, R. (2001). "Like me" as a building block for understanding other minds: Bodily acts, attention, and intention. In B. F. Malle, L. J. Moses, & D. A. Baldwin (Eds.), Intentions and intentionality: Foundations of social cognition (pp. 171–191). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1999). Origins of theory of mind, cognition and communication. Journal of Communication Disorders, 32, 251–269. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Gopnik, A., & Repacholi, B. M. (1999). Toddlers' understanding of intentions, desires, and emotions: Explorations of the dark ages. In P. D. Zelazo, J. W. Astington, & D. R. Olson (Eds.), Developing theories of intention: Social understanding and self-control (pp. 17–41). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1998). Infant intersubjectivity: broadening the dialogue to include imitation, identity and intention. In S. Bråten (Ed.), Intersubjective communication and emotion in early ontogeny (pp. 47–62). New York: Cambridge University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1995). Understanding the intentions of others: Re-enactment of intended acts by 18-month-old children. Developmental Psychology, 31, 838–850. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. & Moore, M. K. (1995). Infants' understanding of people and things: From body imitation to folk psychology. In J. L. Bermúdez, A. J. Marcel, & N. Eilan (Eds.), The body and the self (pp. 43–69). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Gopnik, A., Slaughter, V., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1994). Changing your views: How understanding visual perception can lead to a new theory of the mind. In C. Lewis & P. Mitchell (Eds.), Children's early understanding of mind: Origins and development (pp. 157–181). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Gopnik, A. (1993). The role of imitation in understanding persons and developing a theory of mind. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Understanding other minds: Perspectives from autism (pp. 335–366). New York: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1990). Foundations for developing a concept of self: The role of imitation in relating self to other and the value of social mirroring, social modeling, and self-practice in infancy. In D. Cicchetti & M. Beeghly (Eds.), The self in transition: Infancy to childhood (pp. 139–164). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Social and Cognitive Neuroscience

Shen, G., Meltzoff, A. N., Weiss, S. M., & Marshall, P. J. (2020). Body representation in infants: Categorical boundaries of body parts as assessed by somatosensory mismatch negativity. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 44, 100795. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Body maps in the infant brain: Implications for neurodevelopmental disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 778-783. Click here to receive a reprint

Rosen, M. L., Hagen, M. P., Lurie, L. A., Miles, Z. E., Sheridan, M. A., Meltzoff, A. N., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2019). Cognitive stimulation as a mechanism linking socioeconomic status with executive function: A longitudinal investigation. Child Development. Advance online publication. doi:10.1111/cdev.13315 Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Saby, J. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2019). Neural representations of the body in 60-day-old human infants. Developmental Science, 22, e12698. Click here to receive a reprint

Weiss, S. M., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Neural measures of anticipatory bodily attention in children: Relations with executive function. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 34, 148–158. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Human infant imitation as a social survival circuit. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 24, 130–136. Click here to receive a reprint

Shen, G., Weiss, S. M., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018) The somatosensory mismatch negativity as a window into body representations in infancy. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 134, 144–150. Click here to receive a reprint

Shen, G., Smyk, N. J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Neuropsychology of human body parts: Exploring categorical boundaries of tactile perception using somatosensory mismatch responses. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience,30, 1858–1869. Click here to receive a reprint

Rosen, M. L., Sheridan, S. A., Sambrook, K. A., Meltzoff, A. N., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2018). Socioeconomic disparities in academic achievement: A multi-modal investigation of neural mechanisms in children and adolescents. NeuroImage,173, 298–310. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. Ramírez, R. R., Saby, J. N., Larson, E., & Taulu, S., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Infant brain responses to felt and observed touch of hands and feet: An MEG study. Developmental Science, 21, e12651. Click here to receive a reprint

Shen, G., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Touching lips and hearing fingers: Effector-specific congruency between tactile and auditory stimulation modulates N1 amplitude and alpha desynchronization. Experimental Brain Research, 236, 13–29. Click here to receive a reprint

Rosen, M. L., Sheridan, M. A., Sambrook, K. A., Dennison, M. J., Jenness, J. L., Askren, M. K., Meltzoff, A. N., McLaughlin, K. A. (2018). Salience network responses to changes in emotional expressions of others is heightened during adolescence: Relevance for social functioning. Developmental Science, 21, e12571. Click here to receive a reprint

Shen, G., Smyk, N., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Using somatosensory mismatch responses as a window into somatotopic processing of tactile stimuli. Psychophysiology, 55, e13030. Click here to receive a reprint

Rosen, M. L., Sheridan, M. A., Sambrook, K. A., Peverill, M. R., Meltzoff, A. N., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2018). The role of visual association cortex in associative memory formation across development. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 30, 365–380. Click here to receive a reprint

Saby, J. N., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2016). Beyond the N1: A review of late somatosensory evoked responses in human infants. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 110, 146–152. Click here to receive a reprint

Conboy, B. T., Brooks, R., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2015). Social interaction infants' learning of second-language phonetics: An exploration of brain-behavior relations. Developmental Neuropsychology, 40, 216–229. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Body maps in the infant brain. Trends in Cognitive Science, 19, 483–544. Click here to receive a reprint

Saby, J. N., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2015). Neural body maps in human infants: Somatotopic responses to tactile stimulation in 7-month-olds. NeuroImage, 118, 74–78. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J. & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). Neural mirroring mechanisms and imitation in human infants. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B, 369:20130620. Click here to receive a reprint

Harms, M., Zyas, V., Meltzoff, A. N., & Carlson, S. (2014). Stability of executive function and predictions to adaptive behavior from middle childhood to pre-adolescence. Frontiers in Psychology, 5:331. Click here to receive a reprint

Saby, J. N., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2013). Infants’ somatotopic neural responses to seeing human actions: I’ve got you under my skin. PLoS ONE, 8(10):e77905. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., Saby, J. N., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Imitation and the developing social brain: Infants’ somatotopic EEG patterns for acts of self and other. International Journal of Psychological Research, 6, 22–29. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Saby, J. N. (2013). Infant brain responses to object weight: Exploring goal-directed actions and self-experience. Infancy, 18, 942–960. Click here to receive a reprint

Zalewski, M., Lengua, L., Fisher, P. A., Trancik, A., Bush, N., & Meltzoff, A. N., (2012). Poverty and single parenting: Relations with preschoolers’ cortisol and effortful control. Infant and Child Development, 21, 537–554. Click here to receive a reprint

Saby, J. N., Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2012). Neural correlates of being imitated: An EEG study in preverbal infants. Social Neuroscience, 7, 650–661. Click here to receive a reprint

Bowman, L. C., Liu, D., Meltzoff, A. N., & Wellman, H. M. (2012). Neural correlates of belief- and desire-reasoning in 7- and 8-year-old children: an event-related potential study. Developmental Science, 15, 618–632. Click here to receive a reprint

Decety, J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Empathy, imitation, and the social brain. In A. Copland & P. Goldie (Eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and psychological perspectives (pp. 58–81). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., Young, T., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Neural correlates of action observation and execution in 14-month-old infants: An event-related EEG desynchronization study. Developmental Science, 14, 474–480. Click here to receive a reprint

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff. A. N. (2011). Neural mirroring systems: Exploring the EEG mu rhythm in human infancy. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 1, 110–123. Click here to receive a reprint

Liu, D., Meltzoff, A. N., & Wellman, H. M. (2009). Neural correlates of belief- and desire-reasoning. Child Development, 80, 1163–1171. Click here to receive a reprint

Lamm, C., Meltzoff. A. N., & Decety, J. (2009). How do we empathize with someone who is not like us? A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 22, 362–376. Click here to receive a reprint

Raizada, R. S., Richards, T. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2008). Socioeconomic status predicts hemispheric specialisation of the left inferior frontal gyrus in young children. NeuroImage, 40, 1392–1401. Click here to receive a reprint

Lamm, C., Nusbaum, H. C., Meltzoff. A. N., & Decety, J. (2007). What are you feeling? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the modulation of sensory and affective responses during empathy for pain. PLoS ONE, 2:e1292. Click here to receive a reprint

Cheng Y., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2007). Motivation modulates the activity of the human mirror-neuron system. Cerebral Cortex, 17, 1979–1986. Click here to receive a reprint

Jackson, P. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2006). Neural circuits involved in imitation and perspective-taking. NeuroImage, 31, 429–439. Click here to receive a reprint

Carver, L. J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Dawson, G. (2006). Event-related potential (ERP) indices of infants' recognition of familiar and unfamiliar objects in two and three dimensions. Developmental Science, 9, 51–62. Click here to receive a reprint

Jackson, P. L., Brunet, E., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2006). Empathy examined through the neural mechanisms involved in imagining how I feel versus how you feel pain. Neuropsychologia, 44, 752–761. Click here to receive a reprint

Jackson, P. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2005). How do we perceive the pain of others? A window into the neural processes involved in empathy. NeuroImage, 24, 771–779. Click here to receive a reprint

Chaminade, T., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2005). An fMRI study of imitation: Action representation and body schema. Neuropsychologia, 43, 115–127. Click here to receive a reprint

Aylward, E. H., Park, J. E., Field, K. M., Parsons, A. C., Richards, T. L., Cramer, S. C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). Brain activation during face perception: Evidence of a developmental change. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17, 308–319. Click here to receive a reprint

Decety, J., Jackson, P. L., Sommerville, J., Chaminade, T., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2004). The neural bases of cooperation and competition: an fMRI investigation. NeuroImage, 23, 744–751. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2003). What imitation tells us about social cognition: A rapprochement between developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences, 358, 491–500. Click here to receive a reprint

Blakemore, S-J., Boyer, P., Pachot-Clouard, M., Meltzoff, A. N., Segebarth, C., & Decety, J. (2003). The detection of contingency and animacy from simple animations in the human brain. Cerebral Cortex, 13, 837–844. Click here to receive a reprint

Carver, L., Dawson, G., Panagiotides, H., Meltzoff, A. N., McPartland, J., Gray, J., & Munson, J. (2003). Age-related differences in neural correlates of face recognition during the toddler and preschool years. Developmental Psychobiology, 42,148–159. Click here to receive a reprint

Decety, J., Chaminade, T., Grèzes, J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2002). A PET exploration of the neural mechanisms involved in reciprocal imitation. NeuroImage, 15, 265–272. Click here to receive a reprint

Chaminade, T., Meltzoff, A. N., & Decety, J. (2002). Does the end justify the means? A PET exploration of the mechanisms involved in human imitation. NeuroImage, 15, 318–328. Click here to receive a reprint

Blakemore, S-J., Fonlupt, P., Pachot-Clouard, M., Darmon, C., Boyer, P., Meltzoff, A. N., Segebarth, C., & Decety, J. (2001). How the brain perceives causality: An event-related fMRI study. NeuroReport, 12, 3741–3746. Click here to receive a reprint

Joint Attention

Brooks, R., Singleton, J. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Enhanced gaze-following behavior in Deaf infants of Deaf parents. Developmental Science, 23, e12900. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Connecting the dots from infancy to childhood: A longitudinal study connecting gaze following, language, and explicit theory of mind. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 67–78. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Gaze following: A mechanism for building social connections between infants and adults. In M. Mikulincer & P. R. Shaver (Eds.), Mechanisms of social connection: From brain to group (pp. 167–183). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Click here to receive a reprint

Moll, H., Meltzoff, A. N., Merzsch, K., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Taking versus confronting perspectives in preschool children. Developmental Psychology, 49, 646–654. Click here to receive a reprint

Moll, H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). How does it look? Level 2 perspective-taking at 36 months of age. Child Development, 82, 661–673. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Brooks, R., Shon, A. P., & Rao, R. P. N. (2010). “Social” robots are psychological agents for infants: A test of gaze following. Neural Networks, 23, 966–972. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2008). Infant gaze following and pointing predict accelerated vocabulary growth through two years of age: A longitudinal, growth curve modeling study. Journal of Child Language, 35, 207–220. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Brooks, R. (2007). Eyes wide shut: The importance of eyes in infant gaze following and understanding other minds. In R. Flom, K. Lee, & D. Muir (Eds.), Gaze following: Its development and significance (pp. 217–241). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). The development of gaze following and its relation to language. Developmental Science, 8, 535–543. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2002). The importance of eyes: How infants interpret adult looking behavior. Developmental Psychology, 38, 958–966. Click here to receive a reprint

Stereotypes & Identity Studies: Bridging Social & Developmental Psychology

Master, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Cultural stereotypes and sense of belonging contribute to gender gaps in STEM. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 12, 152-198. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2019). Childhood experiences and intergroup biases among children. Social Issues and Policy Review,13, 211–240. Click here to receive a reprint

del Río, M. F., Strasser, K., Cvencek, D., Susperreguy, M. I., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2018). Chilean kindergarten children’s beliefs about mathematics: Family matters. Developmental Psychology, 55, 687–702. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Fryberg, S. A., Covarrubias, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2018). Self-concepts, self-esteem, and academic achievement of minority and majority North American elementary school children. Child Development, 89, 1099–1109. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). How societal prejudices seep into the minds of our children. UNESCO IBE In Focus: Education & the Future. 98–101. Click here to receive a reprint

Rogers, L. O., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Is gender more important and meaningful than race? An analysis of racial and gender identity among Black, White, and Mixed-race children. Cultural Diverstiy and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 23, 323–334. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Olson, K. R. (2017). "Catching" social bias: Exposure to biased nonverbal signals creates social biases in preschool children. Psychological Science, 28, 216–224. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Social group membership increases STEM engagement among preschoolers. Developmental Psychology, 53, 201–206. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., Moscatelli, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Programming experience promotes higher STEM motivation among first-grade girls. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,160, 92–106. Click here to receive a reprint

Prieto, J. P., Cvencek, D., Llacer, C. V. H., Escobar, A. H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Preschoolers’ mathematical play and colour preferences: A new window into the development of gendered beliefs about math. Early Child Development and Care, 187, 1273–1283. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Building bridges between psychological science and education: Cultural stereotypes, STEM, and equity. Prospects. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Lent, R. (2016). Neuroscience, psychology, and society. Translating research to improve learning. Prospects, 46, 191–198. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2016). Computing whether she belongs: Stereotypes undermine girls' interest and sense of belonging in computer science. Journal of Educational Psychology, 108, 424–437. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Greenwald, A. G., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2016). Implicit measures for preschool children confirm self-esteem's role in maintaining a balanced identity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 62, 50–57. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Kapur, M. & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Math achievement, stereotypes, and math self-concepts among elementary-school students in Singapore. Learning and Instruction, 39, 1–10. Click here to receive a reprint

Cheryan, S., Master, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Cultural stereotypes as gatekeepers: increasing girls' interest in computer science and engineering by diversifying stereotypes. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1–8. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Nasir, N. S., O'Connor, K. O., Wischina, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). The development of math-race stereotypes: "They say Chinese people are the best at math.’ Journal of Research on Adolescence, 25, 630–637. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). Reducing adolescent girls' concerns about STEM stereotypes: When do female teachers matter? International Review of Social Psychology, 27, 79–102. Click here to receive a reprint

Baron, A. S., Schmader, T., Cvencek, D., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). The gendered self-concept: How implicit gender stereotypes and attitudes shape self-definition. In P. J. Leman & H. R. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Gender and Development (pp. 109–132). Click here to receive a reprint

Cheryan, S., Ziegler, S. A., Plaut, V. C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). Designing classrooms to maximize student achievement. Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1, 4–12. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Kapur, M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2014). Cognitive consistency and math-gender stereotypes in Singaporean children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 117, 73–91. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Greenwald, A. G., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2012). Balanced identity theory: Review of evidence for implicit consistency in social cognition. In B. Gawronski & F. Strack (Eds.), Cognitive Consistency: A Fundamental Principle in Social Cognition, (pp. 157-177). The Guilford Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Cheryan, S., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kim, S. (2011). Classrooms matter: The design of virtual classrooms influences gender disparities in computer science classes. Computers & Education, 57, 1825–1835. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Meltzoff, A. N., & Greenwald, A. G. (2011). Math-gender stereotypes in elementary-school children. Child Development, 82, 766–779. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Greenwald, A. G., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). Measuring implicit attitudes of 4-year-olds: The preschool implicit association test. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 109, 187–200. Click here to receive a reprint

Amsterlaw, J., Lagattuta, K. H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Young children’s reasoning about the effects of emotional and physiological states on academic performance. Child Development, 80, 115–133. Click here to receive a reprint

Interdisciplinary Cognitive Science and Robotics

Boucenna, S., Cohen, D., Meltzoff, A. N., Gaussier, P., & Chetouani, M. (2016). Robots learn to recognize individuals from imitative encounters with people and avatars. Scientific Reports, 1–10, DOI: 10.1038/srep19908. Click here to receive a reprint

Chung, M. J-Y., Friesen, A. L., Fox, D., Meltzoff, A. N., & Rao, R. P. N. (2015). A bayesian developmental approach to robotic goal-based imitation learning. PLoS ONE, 10, 1–18. Click here to receive a reprint

Bernstein, D. M., Erdfelder, E., Meltzoff, A. N., Peria, W., & Loftus, G. R. (2011). Hindsight bias from 3 to 95 years of age. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37, 378–391. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Brooks, R., Shon, A. P., & Rao, R. P. N. (2010). "Social" robots are psychological agents for infants: A test of gaze following. Neural Networks, 23, 966–972. Click here to receive a reprint

Kaipa, K. N., Bongard, J. C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2010). Self discovery enables robot social cognition: Are you my teacher? Neural Networks, 23, 1113–1124. Click here to receive a reprint

Demiris, Y., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2008). The robot in the crib: A developmental analysis of imitation skills in infants and robots. Infant and Child Development, 17, 43–53. Click here to receive a reprint

Rao, R. P. N., Shon, A. P., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). A Bayesian model of imitation in infants and robots. In C. L. Nehaniv & K. Dautenhahn (Eds.), Imitation and social learning in robots, humans, and animals: Behavioural, social and communicative dimensions (pp. 217–247). New York: Cambridge University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Shon. A. P., Storz, J. J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Rao, R. P. N. (2007) A cognitive model of imitative development in humans and machines. International Journal of Humanoid Robots, 4, 387–406. Click here to receive a reprint

Bernstein, D. M., Atance, C., Meltzoff, A. N., & Loftus, G. R. (2007). Hindsight bias and developing theories of mind. Child Development, 78, 1374–1394. Click here to receive a reprint

Buchsbaum, D., Blumberg, B., Breazeal, C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). A simulation-theory inspired social learning system for interactive characters. Paper presented at the 14th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO–MAN 2005), Nashville, TN. Click here to receive a reprint

Bernstein, D. M., Loftus, G. R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). Object identification in preschool children and adults. Developmental Science, 8, 151–161. Click here to receive a reprint

Bernstein, D. M., Atance, C., Loftus, G., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2004). We saw it all along: Visual hindsight bias in children and adults. Psychological Science, 15, 264–267. Click here to receive a reprint

Causal Learning

Wang, Z., Williamson, R. A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2018). Preschool physics: Using the invisible property of weight in causal reasoning tasks. PLoS ONE, 13, e0192054. Click here to receive a reprint

Waismeyer, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Learning to make things happen: Infants' observational learning of social and physical causal events. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 162, 58–71. Click here to receive a reprint

Waismeyer, A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Gopnik, A. (2015). Causal learning from probabilistic events in 24-month olds: an action measure. Developmental Science, 18, 175–182. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., Williamson, R. A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2015). Imitation as a mechanism in cognitive development: a cross-cultural investigation of 4-year-old children's rule learning. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 562. Click here to receive a reprint

Wang, Z., Meltzoff, A. N., & Williamson, R. A. (2015). Social learning promotes understanding of the physical world: Preschool children's imitation of weight sorting. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 136, 82–91. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., Waismeyer, A., & Gopnik, A. (2012). Learning about causes from people: Observational causal learning in 24-month-old infants. Developmental Psychology, 48, 1215–1228. Click here to receive a reprint

Bonawitz, E. B., Ferranti, D., Saxe, R., Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A. N., Woodward, J., & Schulz, L. E. (2010). Just do it? Investigating the gap between prediction and action in toddlers' causal inferences. Cognition, 115, 104–117. Click here to receive a reprint

Sobel, D. M., Yoachim, C. M., Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Blumenthal, E. J. (2007). The blicket within: Preschoolers' inferences about insides and causes. Journal of Cognition and Development, 8, 159–182. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). Infants’ causal learning: Intervention, observation, imitation. In A. Gopnik & L. Schulz (Eds.), Causal learning: Psychology, philosophy, and computation (pp. 37–47). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2007). The ‘like me’ framework for recognizing and becoming an intentional agent. Acta Psychologica, 124, 26–43. Click here to receive a reprint

Blakemore, S-J., Fonlupt, P., Pachot-Clouard, M., Darmon, C., Boyer, P., Meltzoff, A. N., Segebarth, C., & Decety, J. (2001). How the brain perceives causality: An event-related fMRI study. NeuroReport, 12, 3741–3746. Click here to receive a reprint

Object Permanence and Object Identity

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Numerical identity and the development of object permanence. In S. P. Johnson (Ed.), Neoconstructivism (pp. 61–83). New York: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2008). Factors affecting infants’ manual search for occluded objects and the genesis of object permanence. Infant Behavior & Development, 31, 168–180. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2004). Object permanence after a 24-hr delay and leaving the locale of disappearance: The role of memory, space, and identity. Developmental Psychology, 40, 606–620. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1999). New findings on object permanence: A developmental difference between two tupes of occlusion. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 17, 563–584. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1998). Object representation, identity, and the paradox of early permanence: Steps toward a new framework. Infant Behavior Development, 21, 201–235. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1995). Infants’ understanding of people and things: From body imitation to folk psychology. In J. Bermudez, A. Marcel, & N. Eilan (Eds.), The body and the self (pp. 43–69). Cambridge: MIT Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Cross-Modal Perception

Meltzoff, A. N. Ramírez, R. R., Saby, J. N., Larson, E., & Taulu, S., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Infant brain responses to felt and observed touch of hands and feet: An MEG study. Developmental Science, 21, e12651. Click here to receive a reprint

Rabinowitch, T., & Metlzoff, A. N. (2017). Joint rhythmic movement increases 4-year-old children's prosocial sharing and fairness toward peers. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1–9. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1996). Infant vocalizations in response to speech: Vocal imitation and developmental change. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 100, 2425–2438. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (1994). Faces and speech: Intermodal processing of biologically -relevant signals in infants and adults. In D. Lewkowicz & R. Lickliter (Eds.), The development of intersensory perception: Comparative perspectives (pp. 335–369). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N, & Moore, M. K. (1993). Why faces are special to infants-On connecting the attraction of faces and infants’ ability for imitation and cross-modal processing. In B. de Boysson-Bardies, S. de Schonen, P. Jusczyk, P. MacNeilage, & J. Morton (Eds.), Developmental neurocognition: Speech and face processing in the first year of life (pp. 211–225). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Click here to receive a reprint

Green, K. P., Kuhl, P. K., Meltzoff, A. N., & Stevens, E. B. (1991). Integrating speech information across talkers, gender, and sensory modality: Female faces. Perception and Psychophysics, 50, 524–536. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., Williams, K. A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1991). Cross-modal speech perception in adults and infants using nonspeech auditory stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 17, 829–840. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1988). Speech as an intermodal object of perception. In A. Yonas (Ed.), Perceptual development in infancy: The Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology (Vol. 20, pp. 235–266). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1984). The intermodal representation of speech in infants. Infant Behavior and Development, 7, 361–381. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1982). The bimodal perception of speech in infancy. Science, 218, 1138–1141. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Borton, R. W. (1979). Intermodal matching by human neonates. Nature, 282, 403–404. Click here to receive a reprint

Bilingualism and Origins of Language

Conby, C. T., Brooks, R., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2015). Social interactions in infants' learning of second-language phonetics: An exploration of brain-behavior relations. Developmental Neuropsychology, 40, 216–229. Click here to receive a reprint

Carlson S. M. & Meltzoff A. N. (2008). Bilingual experience and executive functioning in young children. Developmental Science, 11, 282–298. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2008). Infant gaze following and pointing predict accelerated vocabulary growth through two years of age: A longitudinal, growth curve modeling study. Journal of Child Language, 35, 207–220. Click here to receive a reprint

Heimann, M., Strid, K., Smith, L., Tjus, T., Ulvund, S. E., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2006). Exploring the relation between memory, gestural communication, and the emergence of language in infancy: A longitudinal study. Infant and Child Development, 15, 233–249. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). The development of gaze following and its relation to language. Developmental Science, 8, 535–543. Click here to receive a reprint

Kuhl, P. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1997). Evolution, nativism, and learning in the development of language and speech. In M. Gopnik (Ed.), The inheritance and innateness of grammars (pp. 7–44). New York: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Gopnik, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1992). Categorization and naming: Basic-level sorting in eighteen-month-olds and its relation to language. Child Development, 63, 1091–1103. Click here to receive a reprint

Gopnik, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1987). The development of categorization in the second year and its relation to other cognitive and linguistic developments. Child Development, 58, 1523–1531. Click here to receive a reprint

Gopnik, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1986). Relations between semantic and cognitive development in the one-word stage: The specificity hypothesis. Child Development, 57, 1040–1053. Click here to receive a reprint

Connections to Philosophy of Mind

Meltzoff, A. N. (2013). Origins of social cognition: Bidirectional self-other mapping and the “Like-Me” hypothesis. In M. Banaji & S. Gelman (Eds.), Navigating the social world: What infants, children, and other species can teach us (pp. 139–144). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Russell, J., Cheke, L. G., Clayton, N. S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2011). What can What-When-Where (WWW) binding tasks tell us about young children’s episodic foresight? Theory and two experiments. Cognitive Development, 26, 356–370. Click here to receive a reprint

Moore, M. K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Numerical identity and the development of object permanence. In S. P. Johnson (Ed.), Neoconstructivism: The new science of cognitive development (pp. 61–83). New York: Oxford University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Brooks, R. (2007). Intersubjectivity before language: Three windows on preverbal sharing. In S. Bråten (Ed.), On being moved: From mirror neurons to empathy (pp. 149–174). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins. Click here to receive a reprint

Gallagher, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1996). The earliest sense of self and others: Merleau-Ponty and recent developmental studies. Philosophical Psychology, 9, 211–233. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N., & Moore, M. K. (1995). Infants' understanding of people and things: from body imitation to folk psychology. In J. L. Bermudez, A. Marcel, & N. Eilan (Eds.), The Body and Self (pp. 43–69). MIT Press: Bradford. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1993). Molyneux's babies: Cross-modal perception, imitation, and the mind of the preverbal infant. In N. Eilan, R. McCarthy, & B. Brewer (Eds.), Spatial representation: Problems in philosophy and psychology (pp. 219–235). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. Click here to receive a reprint

Atypical Populations and Autism

Marshall, P. J., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Body maps in the infant brain: Implications for neurodevelopmental disabilities. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 778-783. Click here to receive a reprint

Brooks, R., Singleton, J. L., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Enhanced gaze-following behavior in Deaf infants of Deaf parents. Developmental Science, 23, e12900. Click here to receive a reprint

Faja, S., Dawson, G., Sullivan, K., Meltzoff, A. N., Estes, A., & Bernier, R. (2016). Executive function predicts the development of play skills for verbal preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Autism Research, 9, 1274–1284. Click here to receive a reprint

Munson, J., Faja, S., Meltzoff, A. N., Abbott, R., & Dawson, G. (2008). Neurocognitive predictors of social and communicative developmental trajectories in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 14, 956–966. Click here to receive a reprint

Toth, K., Dawson, G., Meltzoff, A. N., Greenson, J., & Fein, D. (2007). Early social, imitation, play, and language abilities of young non-Autistic siblings of children with Autism. J Autism Dev Disord, 37, 145–157. Click here to receive a reprint

Toth, K., Munson J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Dawson, G. (2006). Early predictors of communication development in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Joint attention, imitation, and toy play. J Autism Dev Disord, 36, 993–1005. Click here to receive a reprint

Dawson, G., Carver, L., Meltzoff, A. N., Panagiotides, H., McPartland, J., & Webb, S. J. (2002). Neural correlates of face and object recognition in young children with autism spectrum disorder, developmental delay, and typical development. Child Development, 73, 700–717. Click here to receive a reprint

Dawson, G., Osterling, J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2000).  Case study of the development of an infant with autism from birth to 2 years of age. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 21, 299–313. Click here to receive a reprint

Dawson, G., Meltzoff, A. N., Osterling, J., & Rinaldi, J. (1998). Neuropsychological correlates of early symptoms of autism. Child Development, 69, 1276–1285. Click here to receive a reprint

Dawson, G., Meltzoff, A. N., Osterling, J., Rinaldi, J., & Brown, E. (1998). Children with autism fail to orient to naturally occurring social stimuli. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, 479–485. Click here to receive a reprint

Rast, M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1995). Memory and representation in young children with Down syndrome: Exploring deferred imitation and object permanence. Development and Psychopathology, 7, 393–407. Click here to receive a reprint

Applied Developmental Psychology

Master, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2020). Cultural stereotypes and sense of belonging contribute to gender gaps in STEM. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 12, 152-198. Click here to receive a reprint

Weiss, S. M., Meltzoff, A. N., & Marshall, P. J. (2018). Neural measures of anticipatory bodily attention in children: Relations with executive function. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 34, 148–158. Click here to receive a reprint

Prieto, J. P., Cvencek, D., Llacer, C. V. H., Escobar, A. H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Preschoolers’ mathematical play and colour preferences: A new window into the development of gendered beliefs about math. Early Child Development and Care, 187, 1273–1283. Click here to receive a reprint

Rabinowitch, T., & Metlzoff, A. N. (2017). Joint rhythmic movement increases 4-year-old children's prosocial sharing and fairness toward peers. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1–9. Click here to receive a reprint

Rabinowitch, T., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Synchronized movement experience enhances peer cooperation in preschool children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 160, 21–32. Click here to receive a reprint

Skinner, A. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Olson, K. R. (2017). "Catching" social bias: Exposure to biased nonverbal signals creates social biases in preschool children. Psychological Science, 28, 216–224. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Social group membership increases STEM engagement among preschoolers. Developmental Psychology, 53, 201–206. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Cheryan, S., Moscatelli, A., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Programming experience promotes higher STEM motivation among first-grade girls. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,160, 92–106. Click here to receive a reprint

Cvencek, D., Fryberg, S. A., Covarrubias, R., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Self-concepts, self-esteem, and academic achievement of minority and majority North American elementary school children. Child Development, 1–17. Click here to receive a reprint

Master, A., Meltzoff, A. N. (2017). Building bridges between psychological science and education: Cultural stereotypes, STEM, and equity. Prospects. Click here to receive a reprint

Zalewski, M., Lengua, L., Fisher, P. A., Trancik, A., Bush, N., & Meltzoff, A. N., (2012). Poverty and single parenting: Relations with preschoolers’ cortisol and effortful control. Infant and Child Development, 21, 537–554. Click here to receive a reprint

Zack, E., Gerhardstein, P., Meltzoff, A. N., & Barr, R. (2013). 15-month-olds’ transfer of learning between touch screen and real world displays: Language cues and cognitive loads. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 54, 20–25. Click here to receive a reprint

Wilson, A. C., Lengua, L. J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Smith, K. A. (2010). Parenting and temperament prior to September 11, 2001, and parenting specific to 9/11 as predictors of children’s posttraumatic stress symptoms following 9/11. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 39, 445–459. Click here to receive a reprint

Zack, E., Barr, R., Gerhardstein, P., Dickerson, K., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Infant imitation from television using novel touch-screen technology. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 13–26. Click here to receive a reprint

Amsterlaw, J., Lagattuta, K. H., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Young children’s reasoning about the effects of emotional and physiological states on academic performance. Child Development, 80, 115–133. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (2009). Roots of social cognition: The 'Like-Me' framework. In D. Cicchetti & M. R. Gunnar (Eds.), Minnesota symposia on child psychology: Meeting the challenge of translational research in child psychology 35, (pp. 29–58). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Click here to receive a reprint

Raizada, R. S., Richards, T. L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, P. K. (2008). Socioeconomic status predicts hemispheric specialization of the left inferior frontal gyrus in young children. NeuroImage, 40, 1392–1401. Click here to receive a reprint

Bransford, J., Barron, B., Pea, R., Meltzoff, A. N., Kuhl, P. K., Bell, P., Stevens, R., Schwartz, D., Vye, N., Reeves, B., Roschelle, J., & Sabelli, N. (2006). Foundations and opportunities for an interdisciplinary science of learning. In K. Sawyer (Ed.), Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (pp. 19–34). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. Click here to receive a reprint

Lengua, L. J., Long, A. C., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2006). Pre-attack stress-load, appraisals, and coping in children's responses to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47, 1219–1227. Click here to receive a reprint

Strid, K., Tjus, T., Smith, L., Meltzoff, A. N., & Heimann, M. (2006). Infant recall memory and communication predicts later cognitive development. Infant Behavior & Development, 29, 545–553. Click here to receive a reprint

Huebner, C. E., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). Intervention to change parent-child reading style: A comparison of instructional methods. Applied Developmental Psychology, 26, 296–313. Click here to receive a reprint

Lengua, L. J., Long, A. C., Smith, K. I., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). Pre-attack symptomatology and temperament as predictors of children’s responses to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46, 631–645. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1999). Born to learn: What infants learn from watching us. In N. A. Fox, L. A. Leavitt & J. G. Warhol (Eds.), The role of early experience in infant development (pp. 145–164). Skillman, NJ: Pediatric Institute Publication. Click here to receive a reprint

Hanna, E., & Meltzoff, A. N. (1993). Peer imitation by toddlers in laboratory, home, and day-care contexts: Implications for social learning and memory. Developmental Psychology, 29, 701–710. Click here to receive a reprint

Meltzoff, A. N. (1988). Imitation of televised models by infants. Child Development, 59, 1221–1229. Click here to receive a reprint

About the Lab

Dr. Meltzoff's Infant and Child Studies Lab conducts interdisciplinary research on developmental science ranging from newborns through elementary-school children and teenagers. His lab chiefly explores how children learn from and about people – the development of social cognition. One central line of work in the lab investigates powerful social learning mechanisms, such as imitative learning and joint attention. This has led to an expanding range of collaborative studies on (i) the development of theory of mind, (ii) how sociocultural factors influence the expression of altruistic behavior in human infants, (iii) cognitive neuroscience studies (MEG/EEG) on infant neural body maps and fMRI work on human empathy, and (iv) experiments using social robots with children to test theories of social cognition. Meltzoff's lab is also testing theoretical connections between developmental psychology and social psychology. This line of work explores: (i) how cultural stereotypes (e.g., math-gender stereotypes) influence children's implicit and explicit self-concepts, (ii) the formation of in-group favoritism based on gender, race, and randomly assigned (minimal) groups, and (iii) how preschoolers acquire social biases and prejudices based on observational learning of adults. Meltzoff and collaborators have also published key studies on language and thought, atypical development (including work on ASD, Deaf, Down's syndrome), and cross-cultural studies comparing children across cultures to test theory, including East Asian cultures (China, Singapore) and Hispanic cultures (Spain, Chile).

Lab Members

Rodolfo Cortes Barragan
Rodolfo Barragan is a postdoctoral fellow working with Meltzoff. Barragan's research examines the origins and development of altruism in human infants. He obtained his Ph.D. from Stanford University, where he worked with Dr. Carol Dweck. In conducting his research program, Dr. Barragan seeks to develop paradigms to (i) assess infant prosocial and altruistic behavior, (ii) examine shared commonalities and differences between infants and non-human primates, and (iii) identify the sociocultural experiences that enhance the expression of altruism in humans.

Rechele Brooks
Rechele Brooks is a Research Scientist and studies infant joint visual attention. Dr. Brooks' main line of research centers on joint visual attention, including gaze following, joint engagement, and pointing. She examines the development of these important social behaviors in infancy and the attributions infants make about others' perceptions and goals based on these behaviors. She has also published papers on how early social cognition contributes to the understanding of language and theory of mind in children with typical and atypical development, including Deaf children and children with autism spectrum disorder.

Dario Cvencek
Dario Cvencek is a Research Scientist working with Meltzoff to integrate developmental and social psychology. He earned a Ph.D. working with social psychologist, Tony Greenwald. Dr. Cvencek's current research focuses on the development of children's gender stereotypes about math, in-group attitudes, and self-esteem using implicit and explicit measures. He also considers how social-cognitive development in children may be propelled by a tendency of the human mind to keep one's cognitions consistent with one another.

Ashley Drew
Ashley Drew is a postdoctoral fellow working on the neural representation of the body in infants. She completed her Ph.D. in psychology working with Professor Peter Marshall, an EEG expert at Temple University. Her dissertation focused on interpersonal visual-tactile influences on sensorimotor EEG measures in infants and adults. Drew's current research interests include using both EEG and MEG methods to investigate somatosensory processing in infants and links between the development of somatosensation and early social cognition.

Allison Master
Allison Master is a Research Scientist working with Profs. Andrew Meltzoff and Sapna Cheryan (social psychology). Before coming to the Institute, she earned a Ph.D. in developmental psychology at Stanford University and a bachelor's degree in psychology at Yale University. Her research interests include social-psychological processes that form the foundation of motivation, identity, and achievement from early childhood through adulthood, as well as how cues to personal identity or group membership may affect stereotyping and other social judgments and behaviors. Currently she is investigating how stereotypes affect interest in STEM fields in children ranging from preschool to high school.

Elizabeth Zack
Beth Zack is a postdoc whose research interests focus on infant imitation from 2-dimensional sources such as television, books, and computers. She is primarily engaged in bridging between science and the community, working in conjunction with Sarah Lytle in I-LABS's Outreach.

Calle Fisher
Calle Fisher earned her bachelor's degree in psychology at the University of Oregon where she worked on projects with Prof. Mary Rothbart. She has administered a wide range of developmental tests including standardized testing and novel lab protocols.. Her area of expertise is behavioral coding from video-records of infant and child behavior and she has been certified on a number of coding systems including Ekman's FACS and the BabyFACS systems.

Craig Harris
Craig Harris has achieved a Master's degree in Education and oversees research on infant development, including studies on imitation, intention, and memory. Harris also has special expertise in statistical analyses having completed workshops and classes in biostatistics with Jim Sackett, and he is a guru on multiple statistical packages.

Dawn Hathaway
Dawn Hathaway received her bachelor of arts degree in English and previously worked at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is an enthusiastic and energetic recruiter and scheduler of research subjects and also performs other lab-related duties with aplomb.

Craig Maddox
Craig Maddox is a utility player in the lab, bringing his undergraduate training in mathematics, physics, and education to bear as a Research Assistant. Craig is the primary tester of children in a variety of cognitive studies, and is skilled at gathering, recording, and organizing experimental data. Much of this research, including the investigation of math-gender stereotypes, is closely related to his teaching background and personal interests. He works with Dario Cvencek on questions of implicit cognition in young children and is expanding his testing to include children in museum settings and schools..

Grace Mak
Grace Mak is a jack of all trades and assists on many aspects of running the lab. She scores infant and child behavior from video-recordings, and also helps to recruit participants into the experiments, checks spreadsheets for accuracy, and is a proof-reader and bibliography checker without equal.

Makeda Mayes
Makeda Mayes is a research assistant working with Meltzoff and Cvencek on the development of stereotypes, identity, and implicit bias in children. She is also doing a special project on the impact of COVID-19 on children's psychological development. She enjoys working with children over Zoom while conducting experiments at a distance in this new research environment.

Current Locations of Former Students/Trainees

Jennifer Amsterlaw, Ph.D.
  Sr. User Researcher, Amazon Kids and Family Digital, Seattle, Washington
Christina M Atance, Ph.D.
  Professor, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
Daniel M Bernstein, Ph.D.
  Canada Research Chair, Psychology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, British Columbia, Canada
Rechele Brooks, Ph.D.
  Research Scientist, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Leslie J. Carver, Ph.D.
  Professor, Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, California
Elizabeth Hanna, Ph.D.
  Principal, Hanna Research & Consulting, LLC, Seattle, Washington
Allison Master, Ph.D.
  Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological, Health, & Learning Sciences, University of Houston,
  Houston, Texas (starting Sept. 2020)
Henrike Moll, Ph.D.
  Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, Ph.D.
  Assistant Professor, School of Creative Arts Therapies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Leoandra Onnie Rogers, Ph.D.
  Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
Maya L. Rosen, Ph.D.
  Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Joni N. Saby, Ph.D.
  Research Scientist, Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Anna Waismeyer, Ph.D.
  User Experience Researcher, Microsoft, Seattle, Washington
Rebecca A. Williamson, Ph.D.
  former Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia
Elizabeth Zack, Ph.D.
  Outreach specialist, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Contact

Phone Number: 
(206) 685-2045
Email: 
meltzoff@uw.edu