Media Coverage & News Releases

Selected media coverage and news releases.

Headline: 
Selected media coverage and news releases.

 2016

12/5/16- UW Today

No peeking: Humans play computer game using only direct brain stimulation

Andrea Stocco, Rajesh Rao, Justin Abernethy, and Darby Losey’s research has "taken a first step in showing how humans can interact with virtual realities via direct brain stimulation."

11/20/2016 - Seattle Magazine

Seattle's Hall of Fame: Education, Health Care and Research/Medicine/Science
I-LABS Co-Director Patricia Kuhl was recognized by Seattle Magazine as one of the "trailblazers who have transformed Seattle in extraordinary ways."

9/7/2016 - University of Washington news release

Feeling they are part of a group increased preschoolers' interest, success in STEM
A new study by University of Washington researchers shows that adding a basic social cue -- making children feel like they are part of a group -- increased preschoolers' engagement in STEM.

7/1/2016 - The Scientist

Is bilingualism good for kids?
New research suggests that raising kids in a dual-language environment might be better for their verbal development than previously realized. I-LABS' Naja Ferjan Ramírez discusses her recent discoveries comparing monolingual and bilingual baby brain responses.

6/13/2016 - University of Washington news release

Success in second language learning linked to brain and genetic measures
The final grades that college students received in a second-language class were predicted by a combination of genetic and brain factors, according to a new study by I-LABS researchers.
Read more about the research, see media coverage »

6/7/2016 - Popular Mechanics

Brain-to-brain communication is closer than you think
I-LABS' Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat discuss the implications for future uses as well as the ethical concerns and limitations of their well-known research in brain-to-brain communication.

6/2/2016 - White House press release

Supporting dual language learners in early childhood settings
I-LABS research on bilingual language learning in children babies learn multiple languages is featured in a White House announcement supporting dual language learning during early childhood.
Read more about I-LABS' role in the White House initiative »

5/10/2016 - University of Washington news release

Brain pattern predicts how fast an adult learns a new language
A five-minute measurement of resting-state brain activity predicted how quickly adults learned a second language, according to a study led by Chantel Prat.
Read more about the research, see media coverage »

5/4/2016 - Wall Street Journal

How babies quickly learn to judge adults
I-LABS research shows that babies are astute observers of the emotional tone of adult interactions and censor their own behavior accordingly. Betty Repacholi and Andrew Meltzoff talk about their latest findings.

4/26/2016 - Washington Post

Researchers explain how stereotypes keep girls out of computer science classes
Attracting more women to computer science requires challenging the societal stereotypes about who "belongs in STEM" before these power stereotypes take hold, argue I-LABS' Allison Master and Andrew Meltzoff and UW's Sapna Cheryan.

4/25/2016 - NBC News

Music may help babies learn better, study finds
I-LABS' Christina Zhao and Patricia Kuhl talk about their findings of how musical experience affected baby brain responses to both music and speech, and the possible role of music in helping children learn.

4/25/2016 - University of Washington news release

Music improves baby brain responses to music and speech
A musical intervention helped babies learn to detect rhythmic patterns, a skill important for both music and speech. I-LABS' Christina Zhao and Patricia Kuhl led the study, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Read more about the research, see additional media coverage »

4/20/2016 - I-LABS News

White House showcases I-LABS research at early STEM event
I-LABS co-directors Andrew Meltzoff and Patricia Kuhl discussed their research related to why early childhood is the best time to set a strong foundation in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) for all children.

4/15/2016 - The Conversation

Why the baby brain can learn two languages at the same time
Naja Ferjan Ramírez, an I-LABS research scientist, describes the science behind why early childhood is the best time to learn multiple languages.

4/4/2016 - University of Washington news release

Bilingual baby brains show increased activity in executive function regions
The brains of babies raised in bilingual households showed greater activation in executive function regions and remained more open to learning new language sounds, according to a study led by I-LABS' Naja Ferjan Ramírez and Patricia Kuhl.
Read more about the research, see media coverage »

4/4/2016 - CBC

Babies take better safe than sorry stance with angry adults
Babies at 15 months of age make snap judgments when a stranger shows anger and they don't forget quickly. I-LABS' Betty Repacholi explains her latest findings.

3/21/2016 - University of Washington news release

Better safe than sorry: Babies make quick judgments about adults’ anger
New social-emotional research from I-LABS' Betty Repacholi and Andrew Meltzoff shows that babies generalize adults' angry behavior even if the social context has changed.
Read more about the research, see media coverage »

3/2016 - Columns magazine

How does baby learn?
From how babies' brains respond to speech and touch to the latest impacts early learning science has made on society, UW's Columns magazine features I-LABS in its March 2016 issue.

2/10/2016 - KUOW (NPR)

How stereotypes affect adolescent black males' perception of themselves
Onnie Rogers, an I-LABS research assistant professor, discusses her research on Black adolescents and social stereotypes about race and gender. She also shares ideas on how parents can talk to their children about race.
Read more about the research »

1/22/2016 - The Conversation

When do children show evidence of self-esteem? Earlier than you might think
I-LABS researchers developed a way to measure preschoolers' perceptions of their overall sense of self-worth. Dario Cvencek, Andrew Meltzoff and UW's Anthony Greenwald describe their research.

 2015

12/7/2015 - The Atlantic

Why robots should be more like babies
Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of I-LABS, explains babies' "secret sauce" for learning and how human learning and machine learning can benefit from roboticists and developmental psychologists working together.

12/1/2015 - University of Washington news release

UW roboticists learn to teach robots from babies
A collaboration between I-LABS and computer scientists has demonstrated that robots can “learn” much like kids — by amassing data through exploration, watching a human do something and determining how to perform that task on its own.
Read more about the research, see additional media coverage »

11/5/2015 - Washington Post

By age 5, children have a sense of self-esteem that rivals adults, study says
Children develop self-esteem by age 5, much earlier than previously thought, according to new I-LABS research that suggests children gain either a positive or negative view of themselves before they begin formal schooling.

11/4/2015 - Huffington Post

A child's lifelong self-esteem emerges earlier than we thought
A provocative new study suggests that by kindergarten, a child's self-esteem is as strong as an adult's. I-LABS' Dario Cvencek and Andrew Meltzoff are co-authors of the study.

11/2/2015 - University of Washington news release

Children’s self-esteem already established by age 5, new study finds
By age 5 children have a sense of self-esteem comparable in strength to that of adults, according to a new study by University of Washington researchers, including I-LABS' Dario Cvencek and Andrew Meltzoff.
Read more about the research, see additional media coverage »

10/21/2015 - Wall Street Journal

For babies, copy-cat games provide a social compass
Babies have interactive neural maps that match their own bodily sensations to their observations of other people's movements. Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of the UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

10/11/2015 - SciDevNet

Will liking math help girls get better scores?
How strongly elementary-school children identify with math—their math “self-concept”—can predict how high they will score on a standardized test of math achievement, according to a study by I-LABS' Dario Cvencek and Andrew Meltzoff.

9/30/15 - University of Washington news release

Math and me: Children who identify with math get higher scores
How strongly children identify with math (their math “self-concept”) can be used to predict how high they will score on a standardized test of math achievement, according to a new study by I-LABS' Dario Cvencek and Andrew Meltzoff.

9/23/2015 - University of Washington news release

UW team links two human brains for question-and-answer experiment
UW researchers enabled pairs of participants to play a question-and-answer game by transmitting signals from one brain to the other over the Internet. Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, and Rajesh Rao, a UW professor of computer science and engineering, are collaborators on the research.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the research »

9/22/2015 - TIME

How to get more girls into computer science
"Geeky" representations may prevent girls from considering a career in computer science, according to research findings by I-LABS postdoctoral researcher Allison Master and Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of I-LABS.

9/15/2015 - KOMO News

UW researchers study body maps in babies' brains
Researchers at I-LABS are among the first to study a baby's sense of touch and how it's registered in the brain, which could be an important part of how babies learn.

9/13/2015 - BBC

Estereótipo de que 'matemática é para garotos' afasta meninas da tecnologia, diz pesquisador (Stereotype that 'Math is for boys' [steers] girls away from technology, says researcher)
BBC Brasil interviews Andrew Meltzoff about the power of stereotypes in shaping children's beliefs about their ability in STEM (science, technology, mathematics and engineering). Meltzoff was in Brazil to speak at a conference convened by the Brazilian Academy of Sciences.

9/8/2015 - University of Washington news release

UW scientists are pioneering research on ‘body maps’ in babies’ brains
I-LABS researchers led by Andrew Meltzoff are among the first scientists worldwide to study body maps in the infant brain.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the research »

8/25/2015 - Fortune

Would more girls study computer science if classrooms were 'less geeky'?
Three times as many high school girls were interested in enrolling in a computer science classes if the classroom where it was taught was “less geeky,” according to a study by I-LABS' Allison Master and Andrew Meltzoff.

8/24/2015 - University of Washington news release

To get girls more interested in computer science, make classrooms less ‘geeky’
A new study, co-authored by I-LABS' Allison Master and Andrew Meltzoff, revealed a practical strategy for narrowing the gender gap in computer science: redesign classrooms to make them more inviting.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the research »

7/30/2015 - KSPS-TV

Born to learn: Brain science and early learning
In a documentary film, I-LABS co-directors Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff describe the latest baby brain science, share insights on how babies learn best, and give sneak peeks of new research studies at the Institute. Filmed in part on location at I-LABS.

7/31/2015 - Seattle Times

UW brain-wave study: Social babies get more out of Spanish lessons
Rechele Brooks of I-LABS talks about how babies who learned the sounds of a foreign language best were the ones who were better at looking back and forth between Spanish-speaking tutors and the toys the tutors described.

7/30/2015 - National Science Foundation | Science360

Babies’ brains show that social skills linked to second language learning
The National Science Foundation featured I-LABS research in its top story on Science360, a news site for "breaking science news that shapes your world."

7/29/2015 - Washington Post

How you talk to your baby now can impact his or her social skills later
Two research studies reveal how social interactions help babies learn language. Patricia Kuhl, co-director of I-LABS, is quoted about how infants' own social skills play a role in their learning.

7/27/2015 - University of Washington news release

Babies’ brains show that social skills linked to second language learning
New findings by I-LABS' Patricia Kuhl, Andrew Meltzoff and Rechele Brooks demonstrate for the first time that an early social behavior called gaze shifting is linked to infants’ ability to learn new language sounds.
Read more about the research »

6/9/2015 - ParentMap

Monkey see, monkey do: How mimicking is changing your child
Research by Andrew Meltzoff and Rebecca Williamson shows how young kids use social observation and imitation to learn STEM.

6/2/2015 - Wall Street Journal

Mixed expat families debate: Which language to speak at home?
One of the most important—and debated—decisions among mixed expat families is which language to speak at home. I-LABS' Naja Ferjan Ramirez, who is raising trilingual children, talks about some of the science behind language development.

6/1/2015 - Seattle Times

'Don't wake the baby' experiment gives new perspective on toddlers’ social skills
New work by Andrew Meltzoff and Rechele Brooks shows that young children understand how the sounds they make influence someone else, an important step toward appreciating that different people have different perspectives on the world.

5/28/2015 - Smithsonian

The many ways baby talk gives infant brains a boost
Studies by I-LABS researchers are highlighted in a feature about how infant-directed speech (“parentese”) is much more than child's play—it's an important learning tool.

4/23/2015 - Smithsonian

Why brain-to-brain communication is no longer unthinkable
Andrea Stocco is quoted in a feature about how brain-computer interfaces could dramatically change how to treat dementia, stroke and spinal cord injuries.

4/10/2015 - Seattle Times

UW expert wins prestigious neuroscience award
Patricia Kuhl's research into the social foundations of language learning has earned her one of the top awards in her field.

4/8/2015 - KUOW

New research suggests synchronizing creates empathy
Synchronous activities could be used to in school programs and, in adults, in improving geopolitical and cross-cultural relationships, I-LABS' Tal-Chen Rabinowitch says in an interview.

4/8/2015 - University of Washington news release

Game played in sync increases children's perceived similarity, closeness
A study by Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, an I-LABS post-doctoral fellow, shows that a simple game played simultaneously on a computer led 8-year-olds to report a greater sense of similarity and closeness to each other.

4/7/2015 - Univision

El mejor recurso educativo para los niños (The best education resource for children)
A reporting team from Univision sought out the expertise of I-LABS as a resource for what parents can do to help their children have the best start in life. The segment includes footage of the I-LABS MEG facility and interviews Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff, co-directors of I-LABS.

3/13/2015 - Education Week

Adjectives, social cues, screens and more: What scientists know about baby brains
Sarah Roseberry Lytle, I-LABS outreach director, highlights practical strategies for parents, educators and other caregivers to use to help boost cognitive development in young children.

2/18/2015 - U.S. News & World Report

The benefits of bath time for babies
Bath time can be a multisensory experience that stimulates children's development. Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.  

2/11/2015 - University of Washington news release

How to interest more girls in computer science and engineering? Shift the stereotypes
Women have long been underrepresented among undergraduates in computer science and engineering. A new study by researchers including I-LABS' Andrew Meltzoff and Allison Master identifies inaccurate stereotypes as a main culprit for that disparity.  
More media coverage of I-LABS research on computer science stereotypes »  

2/16/2015 - GeekWire

Study: Here's how to beat the stereotypes that keep women out of computer science
For computer science to grow, its most persistent stereotype has to fade. That's the takeaway from the work of a group of UW researchers. Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

1/26/2015 - Seattle Times

The growth of language/social skills may start with parents' gaze 
Rechele Brooks and Andrew Meltzoff, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, are beginning to connect the dots between gaze-following at 10 months of age and skills that emerge later such as language and the ability to see the world from someone else’s perspective.
Read more about this research study »  

1/18/2015 - Yakima Herald-Republic

Early learning benefits
A letter to the editor argues that "State legislators should be trying to figure out how to bring 'basic education' for Washington into the 21st century, based on early learning research" from UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.  

1/12/2015 - The New Yorker

The talking cure
The poorer parents are, the less they talk with their children. The mayor of Providence is trying to close the "word gap." Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.  

1/2015 - National Geographic

The first year 
A baby’s brain needs love to develop. What happens in the first year is profound. Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, explains why the baby's brain holds the key to understanding what it means to be human.
Don't miss National Geographic's video featuring Kuhl, "How does a baby's brain work?" »  

 2014

12/9/2014 - UW | 360

Early childhood development tips
Scientists have learned much about the preschool brain over the past decade, but unless they read medical journals, most parents and caregivers have yet to hear about those discoveries. I-LABS is changing that, in part through a series of free online modules that teach everything from early interactions to understanding emotions. Sarah Roseberry Lytle, I-LABS director of outreach, is interviewed.
More coverage of I-LABS Outreach Modules »  

11/26/2014 - Discover Magazine

Top 100 stories of 2014: From the mouths of babes 
How does a babbling baby become a talking tyke? Researchers led by Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, have found part of the answer. Toward the end of the first year of life, they discovered, two brain areas begin coordinating to help babies figure out speech.
Read more about this discovery »  

11/24/2014 - El País

Bilingualism: The best workout for your brain 
Knowing a second language helps other aspects of cognitive function, and I-LABS co-directors Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff talk about research showing brain benefits of bilingualism. This story, published in a Spanish newspaper, coincided with a trip by Kuhl and Meltzoff to see early learning in action in Spain, meet with Spanish officials and give invited lectures.
Read more about the I-LABS trip to Spain »  

11/17/2014 - University of Washington news release

Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy
A couple of years ago a scientist looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, fiber pathway that wasn't t mentioned in any of the modern-day anatomy textbooks he had. Jason Yeatman, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, and his colleagues at Stanford University report their detective work to figure out the identity of the mysterious fiber bundle.
Read a Q&A with the researchers, see additional media coverage of the rediscovered brain pathway»  

11/17/2014 - The Guardian

Major brain pathway rediscovered
A massive white matter tract at the back of the brain, overlooked for the past century, might be crucial for skills such as reading. Jason Yeatman, post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Learning & Brain Science and lead researcher, is quoted.

11/18/2014 - Washington Post

A vital brain structure was forgotten for 100 years because scientists couldn't agree
A group of researchers has tracked the complicated history of a long-forgotten neural pathway. Jason Yeatman, post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences and lead researcher, is quoted.

11/17/2014 - KUOW

Scientists discover secret corridor of brain, lost for 100 years
Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the UW, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

11/5/2014 - University of Washington news release

UW study shows direct brain interface between humans
UW researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration in 2013. Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, and Rajesh Rao, a UW professor of computer science and engineering, are collaborators on the research.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the brain-to-brain communication work »

11/14/2014 - NBC News.com

Wishful thinking: Can scientists read your brain?
While great advances in understanding the brain are being made, no one's going to be taking a sci-fi worthy peek inside your cranium anytime soon. UW research is cited.

11/7/2014 - Washington Post

A breakthrough in brain-to-brain communication using a video game
Scientists from the UW have proven it's possible for people to communicate using only their brains. Specifically, they showed that a player of a shooter-style video game could trigger another player to fire a cannon just by thinking "fire."

11/2014 - Scientific American Mind

When two brains connect
The dawn of human brain-to-brain communication has arrived. I-LABS' Andrea Stocco and UW collaborator Rajesh Rao talk about their direct brain interface research, including related ethical dilemmas.

11/4/2014 - Seattle Times

Warm, bright, quiet: Students do best in well-designed classrooms
A growing body of scientific evidence on the importance of a classroom’s physical environment. A policy paper -- co-authored by Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, and his UW collaborator Sapna Cheryan -- says that classroom decor also has an effect on classroom learning.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the classroom design research »

10/16/2014 - New York Times

Quality of words, not quantity, is crucial to language skills, study finds 
A new study points to the importance of high-quality communication with young children. Patricia Kuhl, a director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.
Read more about how quality, not quantity, of words is important for narrowing the word gap  »

10/7/2014 - University of Washington news release

Toddlers regulate behavior to avoid making adults angry
Children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people’s social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior, according to a new research paper by Andrew Meltzoff and Betty Repacholi of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.
Read more, see additional media coverage of the research »

10/8/2014 - The Atlantic

When do babies learn self-control?
A new study looks at when kids are able to use social cues to regulate their behavior. Andrew Meltzoff, co-author of the study and co-director of Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

10/10/2014 - Huffington Post

Watch what really happens when toddlers see you angry
A video posted recently by UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences shows an experiment in which a 15-month-old boy must decide whether to play with some beads after witnessing an adult get angry when someone else makes noise playing with them.

10/17/2014 - Seattle Times

UW viral video: Toddler leaves toy alone to avoid an adult's anger 
Move over marshmallow test, there's a new video showing the struggles of a toddler to control his impulses and it comes right out of the UW.

10/16/2014 - Seattle Times

Panelists push for need, funding of early-childhood education
Scientists and politicians brought their expertise Wednesday night to a intense discussion about the importance of early childhood education. Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff, co-directors of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, participated.

10/12/2014 - KUOW

Talk to your baby: Her brain depends on it
There's a simple step parents can take to help keep their children on course, starting in year one, something most people take for granted: Baby talk. Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

10/11/2014 - New York Times

Is e-reading to your toddler story time, or simply screen time?
Patricia Kuhl, a co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

9/28/2014 - Seattle Times

What makes kids do their best? UW fellow is trying to find out
Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large writes about the work of Leoandra Onnie Rogers, post-doctoral fellow with I-LABS.

9/24/2014 - Pacific Standard

How a second language trains your brain for math
Second languages strengthen the brain's executive control circuits, with benefits beyond words. Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, show that the basal ganglia may be a key player in bilinguals' improved executive function.
Read more about the research »

8/25/2014 - University of Washington news release

Learning by watching, toddlers show intuitive understanding of probability
In a study led by Anna Waismeyer and Andrew Meltzoff of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, toddlers could tell the difference between two different ways an experimenter played a game, with one strategy being more successful than the other. When it was their turn to play, the children could use the more successful strategy that they observed to increase their odds of winning.
More media coverage of this research »

8/26/2014 - KPLU

Toddlers can figure out a game of chance quicker than you might think
Toddlers use intuition for probability to their advantage, according to a new study led by researchers at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.

7/30/2014 - Seattle Times

Guest: The critical role of doctors in early learning
Brain and economic research unequivocally demonstrate that the earliest experiences matter the most, two pediatricians wrote in a letter to the editor. Families must be taught how language develops, and support them so that they talk and read regularly with their children, starting in infancy. Research from the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences is cited.

7/27/2014 - Seattle Times

Using your brain to capacity, no miracles necessary
One of the benefits of recent brain research is the advances in understanding how to protect and nurture our brains from the start of life, columnist Jerry Large wrote. The Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences has been at the forefront of much of that research, he added.

7/14/2014 - University of Washington news release

Months before their first words, babies' brains rehearse speech mechanics
Infants can tell the difference between the sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age, when their brains begin to focus on the sounds they hear around them. It's been unclear how this transition occurs. Researchers at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences show that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech.
See additional media coverage  »

7/16/2014 - National Public Radio

Even among babies, practice makes perfect
Babies as young as 7 months old are already rehearsing the motions behind speech, even though they can't talk yet. NPR talks with Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.

7/19/2014 - Washington Post

Babies grasp speech before they utter their first word, a study finds
A new UW study has found that a key part of the brain involved in forming speech is firing away in babies as they listen to voices around them.

7/15/2014 - Fox News & Business

Baby talk: Infants may practice words in their minds
Months before they say their first real "mama" or "dada," babies are practicing those words in their heads, new research by the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences suggests.

7/15/2014 - ABC News: Good Morning America

Baby talk could boost babies' brain power
Patricia Kuhl, co-director of UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, talks to "Good Morning America" about the benefits of baby talk.

6/2/2014 - University of Washington news release

UW experts offer free resources to help caregivers boost babies' brains
Researchers at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences are offering a free library of resources showcasing the latest research in how young children learn. Sarah Roseberry Lytle, director of outreach at I-LABS, is quoted.

7/12/2014 - Associated Press

No gadgets required: Parents' talking aids baby brain growth
Scientists have learned a lot about the preschool brain over the past decade. But unless they read medical journals, most parents and others who care for their young children have yet to hear about those discoveries. Patricia Kuhl talks about I-LABS' new series of online learning modules that explain baby brain development and what to do with that knowledge.

6/9/2014 - Seattle Times

New video offers research-based tips to boost early learning
The Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences is putting its research into action by offering parents and other caregivers virtual lessons in how they can support early brain development.

6/24/2014 - KPLU

Wash. scientists cheer docs' push to read to kids starting at birth -- or earlier
The nation’s largest association of pediatricians is recommending parents read to their children starting at birth. Sarah Roseberry Lytle, outreach director at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, talks about research showing how spoken communications enrich a baby’s developing brain right from the beginning.

6/23/2014 - Dallas Morning News

Mayors, here's your brain on early childhood education
The nation’s mayors had a crash course in neuroscience from brain expert Patricia Kuhl, of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences. She showed them research about how much early childhood education makes a difference and how the interaction and experiences children have from birth to five determine what kind of connections in the brain stay over a lifetime.

6/16/2014 - Huffington Post

For Father's Day, get rid working-father myths
There is still a lot of confusion around men and their roles in family life. Research on "parentese" by Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is mentioned as something both mothers and fathers do to help their children learn.

4/29/2014 - South China Morning Post

It's never too early for children to learn a second language, say experts
In case parents are worried that it might be too taxing for children to learn more than one language while they are young, studies by American brain development experts Andrew Meltzoff and Patricia Kuhl show otherwise.

3/27/2014 - ParentMap

2014 superheroes for Washington families
A profile of Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff, co-directors of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, describes them as both big thinkers and big dreamers.

3/30/2014 - Seattle Times

Pilot program gives parents tools to boost babies' brains
Scientists have made compelling discoveries about how babies and young children build the neurological connections they need to understand their world. A recently launched program aims to put those discoveries — and a toolbox of practical tips on how to use them — in the hands of more parents. Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, is quoted.

1/6/2014 - University of Washington news release

Babbling babies -- responding to one-on-one 'baby talk' -- master more words
Common advice to new parents is that the more words babies hear the faster their vocabulary grows. Now new findings from the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences show that what spurs early language development isn’t so much the quantity of words as the style of speech and social context in which speech occurs.
Read more, see additional media coverage on the research paper  »

1/6/2014 - KUOW

'Baby talk' helps babies learn to speak more quickly
Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, discusses her new study on the benefits of “parent-ese," or baby talk.

1/2014 - Slate

Baby talk really does help build your Kiddy-Widdy's vocabulary
An amusing video depicts research from the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences showing how speaking in "parentese'' -- using a sing-song voice and stretching out the sounds of words -- helps babies learn words.

 

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